Nutrition

Why Your Health is the Most Important Investment You Can Make:

*Optimal health will provide you with the energy your body deserves and restore emotional balance*

*Your ability to cope with stress will increase*

*You will create a healthier relationship with yourself and those around you*

*A strengthened immune system can prevent disease and ailments*

 

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Our Approach

Our mind-body approach includes nutritional guidance that helps you understand how to listen to your body, your urges, your cravings and restore emotional balance.

Consultation sessions include conversations about not only what objectives clients wish to achieve, but more importantly what they eat and how issues such as family, work, relationships, thoughts and beliefs about food and body, may affect their objectives. These consultations allow you to dive in deeper to who you are and what you are looking for.

We work together with clients to create strategies that reduce stress and add more enjoyment to their lives as well as their overall relationship with food. Advanced Holistic Center provides a holistic alternative to the “diet” approach to weight loss by aligning objectives with intention, and implementing a roadmap that helps blur the boundaries between the subconscious and conscious to rewire, restore, and reset.

Services

What to expect at your first consultation:

During your first 1 Hour initial consultation, we’ll dive deeper into your lifestyle and health habits to address your main health concerns. We will work on a personalized holistic protocol that includes recommendations on nutrition, movement, lifestyle, supplements and more. In addition, you will learn lifestyle tools to help you understand your cravings, imbalances, and your ability to sustain optimal health!

Traditional Chinese Medicine & Nutrition

Nutrition in traditional Chinese medicine is a complete therapeutic system. At the same time, nutrition follows the same fundamental principles as acupuncture, moxibustion, tui na, therapeutic exercises, and even more so herbal medicine. Every type of food has specific qualities, such as temperature and five distinct types of taste, and these qualities can and are used to either boost or disperse the activities of specific organs, with the goal of restoring and maintaining the general balance between Yin and Yang of the body, the balance among the organs, and finally the balance between Yin and Yang within particular organs. Experts explain that nutrition in traditional Chinese medicine aims to accomplish four goals: (1) to maintain optimal health, (2) to prevent diseases, (3) to reduce or remove illnesses, and even (4) slow aging (Wu & Liang, 2018).

Nutrition plays an important part in traditional Chinese medical system primarily because the body’s ability to convert food into nutrients is considered to be “the root” of survival (Zhao, Tan, Shi, & Xia, 2020). While nutrition plays multifaceted roles in various aspects of human lives, its methods can also be used for diagnostic purposes. For example, each craving may indicate excess or deficiency in an individual organ or organ system, and in combination with other symptoms and signs can help practitioners of this method to establish or confirm diagnoses. Such as cravings for sweet foods suggest weakness of the digestive system, while cravings for salty foods indicate possible issues related to kidney functions. On one hand, this method may seem old-fashioned and perhaps eccentric, but on the other hand the thousands of years it has been in use honed this method into a reliable medical system (Chen & Xu, 1996). Modern research has shown, for instance, that traditional Chinese medical nutrition can be used to treat and prevent the appearance of cancers (Ling, Yue, & Ling, 2014). In other words, taking advantage of nutrition as it is viewed in traditional Chinese medicine can have known as well as unexpected benefits, which are yet to be discovered.

 

Sources
1) Chen, J. D., & Xu, H. (1996). Historical development of Chinese dietary patterns and nutrition from the ancient to the modern society. World review of nutrition and dietetics, 79, 133-153.
2) Ling, C. Q., Yue, X. Q., & Ling, C. (2014). Three advantages of using traditional Chinese medicine to prevent and treat tumor. Journal of integrative medicine, 12(4), 331-335.
3) Wu, Q., & Liang, X. (2018). Food therapy and medical diet therapy of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Clinical Nutrition Experimental, 18, 1-5.
4) Zhao, X., Tan, X., Shi, H., & Xia, D. (2020). Nutrition and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM): a system’s theoretical perspective. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 1-7.

 

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